Posts tagged: Cantorial music

Cantorial Music from Shloimele Rothstein

By , January 25, 2016 3:51 pm

Cantorial Music by Shloimele Rothstein The Recorded Sound Archives has digitized a collection of cantorial music by Cantor Shloimele Rothstein , one of over 260 Cantorial voices to choose from in the RSA’s Cantorial Collection.

Born in Bessarabia on May 1, 1891 in the town of Falesty. He was the first Cantor to sing on KDKA radio in Pittsburgh in 1926 and was contracted by Columbia Grafonola to produce phonograph recordings along with being Cantor at Synagogue B’nai Israel in Brooklyn, NY.

Shloimele’s only teacher was Jerome Hayes of whom he learned several operas with. As a result, he was offered the leading tenor role in “La Juive” by an Opera Co., but refused the offer to give his attention to the Synagogue, Phonograph and Concert work. He passed away on October 19, 1966, at the age of 75.

He is also known as Shlomo Rothstein, Sol Rothstein & Solomon Rothstein.

To listen the voice and recordings of Shloimele Rothstein, click here.

To discover other cantorial voices, please visit the Recorded Sound Archives Cantorial Voices collection.

Cantor Joseph Gross

By , March 10, 2014 11:41 am

Cantor Joseph Gross is a walking encyclopedia of knowledge about Jewish liturgy, Cantorial music, Cantorial voices and the history of the Cantorate in North America.

A delightful gentleman who has stored  a lifetime of learning into his diminutive frame, Cantor Joseph Gross showed up at the Judaica Sound Archives a little over three years ago wondering if he could be of any help. His warmth and his big smile took us in immediately.  But what captivated us was his encyclopedic knowledge of all things Cantorial and liturgical.

As he spoke I could not help but think that he has probably forgotten more than most of us will ever know on the topic. But as he continued, I realized that he is blessed with almost perfect recall.  Not much seems to have been forgotten at all. You may have heard of people with photographic memories, but Cantor Gross is the only person I have ever met with “phonographic  memory,” i.e. he can recall voice and music impeccably.

A master cantor and composer, Joseph Gross has been a regular volunteer at the JSA for over three years now. Several of our Cantorial music restoration projects have been possible only with his guidance and help.

The JSA has created three albums from the original tape recordings of Cantor Gross.  These recordings are not available anywhere else and have never been commercially released.  They were restored under the vigilant supervision of the Cantor himself.

Cantor Stephen Texon

By , July 29, 2013 10:22 am

Equally at home on the opera stage and in the synagogue, Stephen Texon’s successful and distinguished singing career spans decades.

The Judaica Sound Archives is delighted to add the voice of Cantor Stephen Texon to its distinguished online collection of Cantorial and operatic recordings. A native New Yorker, Texon studied at Yeshiva University and NYU. His rich baritone voice was a natural for the opera stage and he was inspired to pursue operatic training in Geneva, Switzerland and at the Met in NYC.

Growing up during the heyday of the Catskill Mountain resorts, Texon was chosen by Sholem Secunda (legendary Yiddish theater composer and conductor) to be the baritone soloist in his choir at the Concord Hotel.

His operatic talents allowed him to perform on stage with such stars as Richard Tucker, Robert Merrill, Placido Domingo and Jerome Hines. But it was the experience of actually performing in a full dress rehearsal performance of “La Traviata” as the understudy for Robert Merrill that remains both a personal and professional highlight for Stephen Texon.

Click here to listen to the music of Stephen Texon.

JSA Featured Performer: Cantor Dale Lind

By , February 7, 2013 12:34 pm

For five generations, the Lind Family, descended from Belzer Hassidim in Galicia, sang the songs of the synagogue. It was from this lineage that Joshua Lind (1890—1973) rose to prominence as a composer, cantor and teacher. Joining his father’s synagogue choir at the age of 5, young David Lind quickly became a Cantorial wunderkind touring the country and recording for RCA Victor.

Together with his brothers, Murray and Phil, David formed the Lind Brothers Trio in 1937. They became quite popular performing a repertoire especially created for them by their father, Cantor Joshua Lind.

The Trio not only had great success in the pulpit, they also became well-known popular entertainers, appearing in night clubs, on the radio, on TV, and in films (Universal International Pictures).

During WWII David and his brothers entertained troops and shared the stage with such stars as Danny Kaye and Betty Hutton. Following the war they headlined in Las Vegas, Hollywood, and on Broadway.

Dale eventually returned to Chicago to pursue a career as a solo performer and cantor, officiating at the Congregation Sons of Joshua since 1974.

Click to hear Cantor Lind’s recordings.

A mother’s loving tribute

By , August 1, 2011 1:25 pm

Mrs. Blanche Serota holds a recording produced by her son under the Musique Internationale label.

Blanche Serota visited the JSA in February 2011 to arrange for the donation of  her son’s personal record collection to the Judaica Sound Archives at FAU Libraries.

Mrs. Serota was clearly still grieving over the loss of her son, lawyer and record producer, Barry Serota, when she visited the JSA.  She told me that her son was never interested in making money.  He collected and produced Jewish music recordings just for the love of it.

She wanted to honor his his memory.  It comforted her to know that what he loved so much would find a warm welcome and a permanent home at the Judaica Sound Archives at FAU Libraries.

Ben Roth-Aroni, RSA’s sound archivist, was especially elated about the gift. His  relationship with Barry Serota went back to the early 1970’s when he was employed as Serota’s tape editor.  “When I first heard about his passing, it didn’t sink in right away.  I couldn’t believe it! I was very fond of him. I called Barry’s mother to offer my condolences and to tell her how much I admired his dedication to the preservation of cantorial and other Jewish music. I invited her to visit the Judaica Sound Archives. She was spending the winter in West Palm Beach and I thought she would be interested in what we were doing here.”

Mrs. Serota was unable to make the trip to Boca Raton that winter but we made arrangements for Ben to visit her in Chicago to assess the collection of recordings and Musique Internationale masters that were stacked in her basement.  “I would have to say that it was pleasantly overwhelming!” he reported.  He estimated that there were approximately 100 boxes of recordings, record masters, and reel-to-reel tapes.

Meeting Mrs. Serota face-to-face for the first time, Ben talked about his memories of Barry. She remembered the beautiful voice of Ben’s father, Cantor Zvee Aroni. And so they talked and ate deli sandwiches for lunch.

Dr. Wiiliam Miller (right), Dean of FAU Libraries, looks on as Blanche Serota (middle) and Maxine Schackman (left) pose in front of the new "gold record" honoring Barry Serota.

 By the time Ben left Chicago Mrs. Serota had made up her mind to donate all the recordings she had to the JSA.
The following February Ben personally escorted Mrs. Serota to Boca Raton where she was visibly impressed by what she saw.  Dr. Miller arranged for a JSA  donor recognition “gold record” to be placed on the JSA Sound Angel wall. Mrs. Serota expressed her pleasure in knowing that her son’s memory and his work would be appropriately honored.

FAU Libraries accepts generous gift in memory of Barry Serota

By , July 21, 2011 3:01 pm

When Barry Serota’s life suddenly ended because of a heart attack in November 2009, the world of recorded Jewish music lost one of its most respected professionals.

Barry Serota, a practicing attorney and executive director of the Institute for Jewish Sound Recording, died suddenly November 16, 2009 on a plane flight between New York and Madrid on the way to Israel.

Serota, widely known for his deep knowledge of Jewish music, had produced more than 100 recordings of Jewish sacred and secular music. Serota’s output at the Institute, based in Chicago, included choral, instrumental, folk and art music. Serota was especially known a promoter of chazzanut. Starting in 1969, he issued many esoteric Jewish music recordings under the imprint of Musique Internationale.

Serota, an advisor to the Milken Foundation, worked on their large project of the Library of American Jewish Music, the recordings which were published under the Naxos label. He was also involved in the Foundation’s oral-history project, for which he interviewed many of the leading figures in Jewish music.

Serota earned degrees at Columbia University and the Jewish Theological Seminary, and received a law degree from De Paul University of Chicago. He lectured widely, including numerous professional and academic organizations such as the Cantorial Council of America, HUC (Hebrew Union College), TACI (Tel Aviv Cantorial Institute), and the Museum of the Diaspora.

At the time of his death, Jeffrey P. Lieuwen wrote, “I hope the enormous collection he leaves behind will fall into good hands, so it will be preserved for generations to come.” I hope Mr. Lieuwen and others will be pleased to learn that Barry Serota’s mother, Mrs. Blanche Serota, has donated his entire personal collection to the Judaica Sound Archives at FAU Libraries.

Soul music for the High Holy Days

By , August 25, 2010 1:05 pm

During the High Holy Days Jews around the world congregate to experience a sense of spiritual community.  It is a time of family gatherings and happy times juxtaposed with introspection and solemn prayer.

In choosing the music for this year’s JSA High Holy Days Music Mix we wanted to highlight the voices of cantors who have devoted themselves to perfecting their art. The High Holy Days has inspired some of the most beautiful and compelling Jewish sacred music ever recorded. On this album we feature such legendary cantors as Leib Glantz, Leibele Waldman, Gershon Sirota and Moishe Oysher. We also highlight the interpretations of some of today’s finest cantors.

In addition, we also wanted to share the more upbeat, happy tunes that appeal to children learning about Jewish traditions and the meaning of the holidays. Some of my fondest memories are of helping my mother prepare for the big holiday dinner and learning about the special foods that meant a “happy new year!’

This special mix of songs has been excerpted from albums which can be heard any time on our website. The mix includes light-hearted, yet meaningful, songs for children.  It also includes some of the most beautiful cantorial music ever written. Enjoy!

Click here to hear all 18 songs or to listen to your favorites.

These songs are for your listening pleasure only.  They may not be copied, reproduced or sold.

Excerpts of selections from these albums were used to create the JSA High Holidays Music Mix 5771.

Click on any title to hear the entire album.

(1) Ye Shall Rejoice On Your Festivals by Shimon & Ilana Gewirtz

(2) Simeni Ka Hotam by Cantor Ehud Spielman

(3) Misha Alexandrovich by Cantor Misha Alexandrovich

(4) Concerts & Recitals #3 by Cantor Zvee Aroni

(5)  Our Prayers in Song by Cantor Henry Butensky

(6) Prayers of My People by Cantor Louis Danto

(7) Chants Folkloriques Israeliens by Cantor Michel Heymann

(8)  Hallel & Three Festivals by Cantor Leib Glantz

(9) High Holy Days in a Conservative Synagogue by Cantor Moshe Schwimmer

(10) Holidays around the Year by Chaim Parchi

(11) Kinder Songs – Holiday Songs for the Entire Family by Cantor Deborah Katchko-Gray

(12) S’iz Yontev Kinder! Lomir Zingen by Cindy Paley

(13) Teshuva: Liturgical Explorations for the Days of Awe by Ramon Tasat

(14) Chassidic Melodies by Cantor Leibele Waldman

(15) Cantorial Chants & Jewish Songs by Cantor Seymour Schwartzman

(16) European Recordings (1906-1907) Vol. 2 by Cantor Gershon Sirota

(17) The Power, The Glory, The Soul of Moishe Oysher by Moishe Oysher

May You Be Inscribed in the Book of Life

By , September 11, 2009 7:44 pm

On Rosh Hashanah it is written and on Yom Kippur it is sealed: how many will pass from the earth and how many will be created….But during the Days of Awe, Repentance, Prayer and Charity can avert a severe decree.

Some of Judaism’s most beautiful and compelling music has been inspired at this sacred time of year.  The importance, emotion and solemnity of the music of the Holy Days represent the highest achievements of the cantorial art. The Judaica Sound Archives at Florida Atlantic University Libraries is proud of its outstanding collection of cantorial recordings. During the next few weeks the JSA will highlight some of the great cantors of the past and present singing the music of the High Holy Days.

The incredible lyrical tenor voice of Cantor Leib Glantz evokes the feeling and intensity of the old “Ba’al T’filoh” of Eastern European Jewish communities. Through his voice and his compositions we can be transported through time to an era long gone, but not forgotten.

Born in Kiev (Ukraine) in 1898, Cantor Leib Glantz lived in the USA from 1926 to 1954 when he was able to fulfill his dream of moving to Israel. He died on January 27, 1964 in Tel Aviv. He was the last, and perhaps the greatest cantor of the “Golden Age of Chazanut.”

The quality of his musical education, his penetrating knowledge of the Hebrew language, and his deep philosophical religiosity, enabled him to create musical interpretations of the prayers that brought new light and meaning to every word. “The words he sang seemed destined to rise like angels into the heavens. To listen to him was like witnessing a man speaking to God! He had a voice that sang like no other voice. Many cantors have tried to imitate his singing, but few have felt they have succeeded.”

Glantz combined his cantorial art with fervent and tireless Zionist activism. He edited a Zionist newspaper and was a leader in the Zionist movement in Eastern Europe, the United States, and finally, Israel.

Leib Glantz was a great scholar who explored the origins of Jewish music and firmly established the historical continuity of Jewish music from its beginning in the Holy Temples of Jerusalem to modern times. He also founded an Academy for Cantors in the Tel Aviv Institute for Jewish Liturgical Music.

Click here to listen to this album

Click here to listen to this album

Panorama Theme by Themocracy